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How I got rid of high pitched USB noise – once and for all

December 3, 2016  |  Blog, Hardware, Music production, Studio

Something I have been trying to fix for a long time is the annoying high pitched noise that I would hear in the background when recording sounds from my external gear. I guess it has been there more or less since I got my expensive Asus motherboard for the PC. That was years ago but it wasn’t really until I started building and using my modular synth that I started noticing the noise. Somehow it was enhanced by the modular to a degree where I couldn’t ignore it anymore.

I tried a lot of things to solve the issue including buying two kinds of audio ground isolators. They did work. Well sort of… First of all I had to use a lot of them, because I have a big selection of external gear I want to record. Secondly the isolators capped a good part of the lower end spectrum, so a bass sound or kick drum would sound very week. I could compensate with an EQ but it was just too much hassle and I would never get it to sound exactly like it did without the isolators.

Hi-speed USB IsolatorThere is this thing called an USB isolator which you can buy on the cheap from Amazon or from China, or whatever. And they really do work as promised, by removing just the USB noise and keeping everything else. The problem is, until now if you wanted an USB isolator that could be used for Hi-speed USB, meaning it should be able to shuffle enough data for more than two audio channels, they would cost in the range of $250-300. But luckily, technology tends to evolve and today a hi-speed USB Isolator is finally affordable.

HiFImeDIY is now selling a Hi-speed USB Isolator with a price tag of $79. I got mine a few weeks ago and I’m super happy with it. All USB noise is gone and I’ve had no problems like dropouts etc running 16 channels in 24 bit and 96 kHz sample rate.
So.. yeah I’m super happy. One less problem to worry about. 🙂

I installed the Trigger IO expansion for the LXR drum machine

November 7, 2016  |  DIY, Drum machine

Here’s another little project I had been saving for a rainy (dark) day. Yesterday I brought out my soldering iron again and spend a bunch of hours putting together this little thing.
I can now use the Sonic Potions LXR drum machine to trigger up to seven simultaneous sounds on my analog gear. The sync in/out jacks allows me to either let the LXR send out a master clock or have it controlled by for example my Roland System-100 or the modular.

One more little project is finished: installing the trigger IO expansion for the Sonic Potions #LXR #drummachine #diy #drummachines #sonicpotions #sonicpotionslxr

A photo posted by Björn Fogelberg (@knatter_xakk) on

 

I’m in the book Svensk Videospelsutveckling (Swedish video game development)

November 4, 2016  |  Amiga, Games

I was interviewed for creating the game Cybergames for the Commodore Amiga in the mid 90s.

Just got my copy of the book Svensk videospelsutveckling (Swedish computer game development), where I'm one of the 150 ppl interviewed for their contribution to game development in Sweden from the 50s to the 90s. #swedishgamesindustry #commodoreamiga #retrogames #retrogaming #amigagames #gamedev #16bitgaming #gamedevelopment

A photo posted by Björn Fogelberg (@knatter_xakk) on

 

BONZAI 2016 THE PHOENIX CODE (C64)

November 2, 2016  |  Commodore 64, Demo

Back in the mid to late 80’s I was quite active in the Commodore 64 demo scene, as Knatter of XAKK. That ended in 1990 when I got an Amiga and ventured into a period of game development.
I still like to keep track on what goes on with the old C64. There is a quite active demo scene, mostly consisting of men in their 40s and early 50s, hellbent on pushing the 8 bit boundaries even further.
Once in a while something really impressive is released, like this fresh new demo from Bonzai, called the Phoenix Code. Recorded on a real C64. Everything is great with it. The overall design and graphics, the coding and of course the music, oh the music.